Q&A

What is Texans for Safe Reliable Transportation?

Texans for Safe Reliable Transportation (TSRT) is a coalition of individuals, employers, trade associations, and public safety organizations dedicated to improving transportation in Texas.

What is TSRT’s goal?

Our goal is to improve public safety, economic development and quality of life in Texas by getting needed roads, rail, public transportation and other infrastructure built and operating years sooner than expected – without massive tax increases.

How will TSRT achieve its goal?

Texans for Safe Reliable Transportation will straightforwardly and relentlessly raise public awareness of transportation challenges, solutions and successes. We will communicate with the news media, build broad-based coalitions, promote public service announcements and informational advertisements, and help organize speakers and briefings for Texas civic and business groups. In doing so, we will successfully challenge the current negative tone of and work to eliminate misinformation on transportation issues in our state, thereby paving the way for a better transportation system in Texas.

Is TSRT a front-group for a special-interest agenda?

No. We are public interest group interested in promoting an improved transportation system in Texas. Texans for Safe Reliable Transportation is a non-profit corporation. We are dedicated to educating and informing the Texas public about transportation challenges, solutions and successes and achieving our aforementioned goal. This organization cannot and will not be involved in partisan politics or the election or defeat of candidates.

Why do we need better roads?

With our state’s population expected to more than double in the next 35 years, Texas must address its transportation needs today. Excessive traffic congestion hurts job creation, public safety and quality of life.

During the past 25 years, our state’s population grew 57%, road use increased 95%, and road capacity grew just 8%. Over the next 25 years, our population is expected to grow 64%, road use 214%, and road capacity only 6%.

What about using Texas’ state transportation funds to pay for better roads in Texas?

During the past 25 years, Texas has shifted $10.8 billion in state transportation funds to other uses. Over the next 25 years, the state is expected to shift another $13.5 billion for other priority needs.

If Texas is growing so fast, can’t we just use tax dollars from new residents to pay for roads as we need them?

Texas’ spending on transportation cannot keep pace with increasing demand brought on by population growth and economic progress. Federal and state diversions of Texas’ transportation dollars are expected to continue well into the future. Available capacity on our roadways will continue to dwindle. Therefore, Texans must address their transportation needs using new approaches to infrastructure development and funding.

What solution does TSRT propose?

TSRT, along with state leaders and transportation officials are promoting a comprehensive package of new short- and longer-term plans and transportation alternatives including:

  • The Texas Mobility Fund and state highway fund bond financing
  • State and local toll partnerships
  • Regional Mobility Authorities
  • Pass Through Financing
  • Rail relocations and improvements

Won’t these solutions cost taxpayers more money and take a long time?

These solutions provide innovative and fiscally responsible ways to construct needed transportation infrastructure years sooner without increasing the tax burden on Texas consumers and employers.

Aside from eased traffic congestion, what is the benefit of more and better roads?

These common-sense solutions will also create thousands of Texas jobs, and provide safe and efficient transportation alternatives for commuters and commerce. New toll roads and tolled lanes will give motorists an alternative to using existing roads, relieving congestion and improving safety for both existing and newer roads.

How can I contribute to TSRT?

Please click here for more information.